Design A Kitchen

Restaurant Design - Commercial Kitchen Plans - CAD Design

Call us to start talking about your commercial kitchen design.
1-800-840-3610 or email: brios@jeansrs.com

 

Jean's Restaurant Supply believes in one vision: to provide knowledge so that success is the only option.

Our team of professionals can help you get the designs and plans ready to:

  • Open A New Restaurant
  • Expand Your Existing Kitchen
  • Remodel Plans for your Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and Framing Contractors
  • White Box and Lease Space Designs to visualize the layout before you sign the contract
    1. Detailed Restaurant Floor Plans
    2. Equipment Drawings For the Plumber and Electrician
    3. Kitchen Remodel Plans
    4. 3D Kitchen Design
    5. Consulting For Expansions To Existing Kitchens
    6. Bar Designs and Layouts
    7. Equipment Specifications and Schedules

    Commercial Kitchen Design



    Email our design team at: brios@jeansrestaurantsupply.com

    Inspiration - Innovation - Fabrication

    Branding:

    Do not make the same mistakes many restaurant owners do and open a business without consulting an expert. If you fail to plan then you plan to fail.


    Front Of The House:

    Food presentation is a very important part of running a successful restaurant. What level of quality do you expect your customers to perceive about your food and your business? Are you cheap and fast kitchen or are you an elegant culinary destination?

     

    • If you serve high dollar steaks then do not use cheap silverware and knives. Your customer will assume the quality of the food is not great if the utensils to eat with are not high quality.
    • Enchiladas served in cracked dull plates will not be as appetizing as when served on brilliant white plates. This simple touch can take your plate from fast casual prices to authentic Mexican cuisine. People will swear that the same exact enchiladas taste BETTER in clean white china then they do on cheap plastic plates.

     


    Back Of The House:

    Hood Systems

    • Air conditioning considerations
    • Air balance and the issues with negative pressure making it hard to open the front door
    • Hood design for the right equipment. Not all hoods are the same or designed for the same cooking equipment

     

    Walk In Coolers and Refrigeration Needs

    Prep Area

    Storage

    Work Flows and Expedite

    Dishrooms


    Bathrooms

     

    • Clean bathrooms: Important for your customers to feel comfortable.

     


    Lighting Systems

     

    • Intimate darker lighting is more calm and for the type of restauant that expects customers to stay for an hour or more
    • Brighter lighting bring more energy to the space and is great for fast food or casual restaurants where turning as many tables as possible is the goal.

     


    Parking Lot

     

    • Having enough parking and the right traffic flow can make or break a business.
    • Egress requirements

     


    Leasing

     

    • Work with your landlord to negotiate help in paying for the air conditioning and the grease trap.

     


    Marketing:

     

    • Get the word out about what your business is and what types of products you offer

     


    Finance

     

    • Get the word out about what your business is and what types of products you offer

     

    Restaurant Design - Commercial Kitchen Plans - CAD Floor Plans

    Designing a commercial kitchen requires careful planning and knowledge of architecture, equipment and construction methods. These elements are critical to bridge the gaps between design and construction. We offer a variety of commercial kitchen design services to cover all the areas off your project.

    We offer consulting to owners, architects, engineers and contractors to aid in expediting the design process of a commercial kitchen.

    Restaurant floor plans are essential in delivering information about each piece of equipment. Water lines, drain lines, power and ventilation requirements are all properly addressed in our commercial kitchen designs.

     

    When you are dealing with any size commercial kitchen project you need to make sure that the work needed to make the equipment run is set out in a plan. By avoiding this crucial step you can unwilling run up construction costs and lose time. We can eliminate that headache for you.


    The Plumber

    A detailed layout of the plumbing for your equipment will save you tremendous amounts of time and money. Never assume that your plumber will know the requirements of your equipment. Missing something as simple as a floor drain for an ice machine could mean huge increases in your construction bill. Your plumber will have to charge you for cutting through the concrete, laying in the drains, and covering up the concrete. On top of that you will be charged by the flooring crew that will patch up the work. New invoices pile up and your project is now set back even further on the calendar. All of this can be avoided by making sure your plumbing requirements are on a blue print.

    Plumbing blue prints for your restaurant equipment give you these advantages:.

    • Locates all floor drains required for the operation of the equipment.
    • Ensures water utilities are supplied to the proper areas of your space
    • Detailed schedules give your plumber the right information to size gas pipes, drains, and water lines before the equipment is installed.
    • Provides a tool to have your job bid accurately. The work is spelled out completely for the plumber.
    • Avoids delays by laying out the entire scope of work. Eliminates any charges for additional work not called for at the start of the project.


    The Electrician

    So you've set up your ice machine and have the refrigeration line sets ready to go. Power is wired to the junction box for the ice maker. Where is the jumper wire to the remote condenser? The electrician's response: "You didn't tell me I had to run a jumper wire from the roof condenser down to the ice maker. I'll have to charge you." It's easy to assume that the electrician should have known that. However one simple fact remains; it wasn't in a drawing. If everything required for the operation of your equipment is laid out in CAD, then you have documented proof of the scope of work required. A blue print design is your key to a flawless installation.

    Electrical plans for your restaurant equipment will give you these advantages:

    • Notes all work required by the electrician for final connection to your equipment
    • Provides the right electrical outlets specific to the equipment you are installing
    • Your electrician will be able to properly size the breaker panel and provide dedicated breakers as needed
    • Electrician can bid project in full. No unforeseen work will arise which will bring up construction costs.
    • Avoids delays by laying out the entire scope of work. Eliminates any changes or additional work


    Mechanical

    Vent hoods and HVAC systems within your kitchen make up the scope of the mechanical work. Having the requirements of your vent hood laid out in a blue print is absolutely essential. Many cities will grant you a mechanical permit only if you have everything laid out in a plan. Our mechanical layout outs provide you with detailed information necessary for a complete installation of the vent hood. These include details on flashing sizes, roof penetration cuts, wall penetration cuts, electrical requirements for the vent hood, CFM calculations for your specific cooking line, and a properly sized vent hood.

    Mechanical vent hood plans for your restaurant equipment will give you these advantages:

    • CFM calculations based up on your specific cooking equipment. Provides for a balanced HVAC system.
    • Fan sizing for your vent hood which is also crucial in determining the overall electrical load required
    • Aids in getting city approvals and permits for building construction
    • Provides information for the ANSUL installer to properly locate nozzles and size the tank
    • Avoids delays by laying out the entire scope of work. Eliminates any additional cost for work not originally specified.